“Food” Photo Contest

We were impressed with how many of you voted on the “Smiling Faces” contest and are happy to announce, that with a smidge over 33% of the votes, the winner is Sue O’Brien with photo number 7! A matted photo of the Riggin will be on it’s way to you soon Sue!

Now, are you ready to vote for the November submissions?

“Food” was the topic of the month and we have some tasty one’s for you to vote on.

Photo 1

Photo 1

Photo 2

Photo 2

Photo 3

Photo 3

Photo 4

Photo 4

Photo 5

Photo 5

Photo 6

Photo 6

Photo 7

Photo 7

Photo 8

Photo 8

Photo 9

Photo 9

Photo 10

Photo 10

We know it’s a very busy time of year for you and it might be hard to find good images to send in, but keep in mind the deadline for the December topic of “Quiet” isn’t until January 15th. This means after the craziness of holiday get-togethers you still have a few weeks to look back over your trip photos and choose up to 3 images that say “Quiet” to you. We can’t wait to see what you have to share!

In the meantime, enter your vote below for your favorite “food” photo!

Happy Faces Photo Contest

In last month’s e-newsletter we announced the first topic in our off-season photo contest. Those who wanted to submit a photo had until November 9th to e-mail up to three photos that match the month’s theme – “Happy Faces”.

If you’d like to take part in next month’s contest here’s how it works: get your photos off the camera (always a good place to start), edit them (if you’d like), and then send them into us at sail@mainewindjammer.com. The only two requirements are it has to match the topic and be Riggin related somehow. The subject for November is: “Food”

A big thank you to everyone who submitted and allowed the use of their photos for the October. We loved seeing all the smiling faces!

Take a look below at the entries submitted and vote in the poll at the bottom of the post. We will announce the winner in next month’s newsletter, and here too of course! You can vote as often and as many times as you’d like.

Photo 1

Photo 2

Photo 3

Photo 4

Photo 5

Photo 6

Photo 7

Photo 8

UPDATE:
The voting period has now ended. Please see your December e-newsletter and blog post to come)  for the winner!

Preparing for Hurricane Sandy

If you are a subscriber to our e-newsletter you know we spent 10 days hauled out and up on the railway to do a  few repairs and some maintenance that will not be needed in the spring.

With Hurricane Sandy making its way north Captain Jon and the crew worked hard to get the rest of down fit completed including the winter frame and cover up, on, and shrink-wrapped, completed yesterday, just in the nick of time. Guess who has the day off today?! Actually now that downfit is complete the crew is now officially done for the season, but more on that in another post.

Schooner J&E Riggin - winter cover is on

The cover is on and shrink wrapped – the Schooner J&E Riggin is ready for winter and Hurricane Sandy.

We appreciate all the calls, emails, Facebook posts, and texts that our passengers send checking in on us when bad weather comes our way. Hurricane Sandy has brought a wave of concern so we wanted to share what’s happening for us so far.

To get the Riggin ready for Sandy both anchors were removed to get rid of remaining extra weight, picked up our mooring, have doubled up all the lines and extra fenders.

Windjammer Wharf in Lermond Cove, Rockland Maine gives refuge to vessels looking to stay out of Hurricane Sandy's way.

Windjammer Wharf in Lermond Cove, Rockland Maine gives refuge to vessels looking to stay out of Hurricane Sandy’s way.

We are very lucky to have our dock space in Lermond Cove, the safest place to be in Rockland Harbor and to have the extra dock space available for other vessels to come hunker down and ride out severe storms  - such as Sandy. It is also great to have the Rockland Breakwater at the head of our harbor. It’s mighty wall help to soften the waves that come in to our shoreline.

For Hurricane Sandy there isn’t a spare space left in Lermond Cove with the 3 schooners (J&E Riggin, Stephen Taber, and Nathaniel Bowditch) in  their respective spots there are also several other sailing vessels, the MV Monhegan, all the ferry boats are docked,  and a few barges have joined the party even having their spuds down to hold them in place.

Lermond Cove is full of vessels ready to ride-out Hurricane Sandy

Lermond Cove is full of vessels ready to ride-out Hurricane Sandy

At the time of this posting the winds are sustained around 20 mph with gusts up to 60 mph and the rain has not yet started. Our tide this morning was an astronomical high tide and while no flooding was happening here in Rockland,  down in Portland flooding was an issue. This will be a bigger concern on tonight’s high tide once the rain does start to fall.

Winds and tide in Rockland Harbor

By 10am the winds had started to kick up as the waves continued to wash ashore after the astronomically high tide.

The National Weather Service gives the forecast for the Penobscot Bay area as:East winds 15 to 25 kt with gusts up to 35 kt… increasing to 25 – 35 kt with gusts up to 50 kt this afternoon. Seas 3 to 5 ft building to 5 to 8 feet this afternoon. Rain in the afternoon, patchy fog. Tonight – East winds 25-35 kt with gusts up to 55 kt and seas 8 to 10 feet.

waves crash to the shore with Hurricane Sandy

The waves this morning are a small sign of the larger waves to come later tonight as Hurricane Sandy reaches the Midcoast Maine area.

We would also like to take a moment to say our thoughts are with the crew of the HMS Bounty who sank earlier this morning. We are glad to hear that 14 of the 16 crew members have been rescued and our thoughts and prayers are with the 2, and their families, that are still missing.

Activities To Do On Your Maine Vacation – part 3

Here is part three of our list of activities to do before or after your Maine windjammer cruise? Make sure to plan a few extra days and enjoy one of these fun activities.

  • Watch sweets be made at the Daffy Taffy & Fudge Factory in Boothbay. Watch sweets be made including the antique Kiss Wrapping Machine. Enjoy the Harbor’s only candy-maker cook pull, flavor, design and wrap Maine’s nicest-eating Saltwater Taffy. The fudge factory makes Downeast fudge daily that is shipped all over the world. Their fudge is made from real chocolate from a blend of imported cocoa beans, fresh cream and butter. Call 207 633 5178 for additional information.
  • Visit the Penobscot Marine Museum. The mission of Penobscot Marine Museum is to preserve, interpret and celebrate the maritime culture of the Penobscot Bay Region and beyond through collections, education, and community engagement. It is Maine’s oldest maritime museum was founded in 1936 by descendants of Searsport sea captains. The original building was Old Town Hall, built in 1845 and given to the Museum by the town to display our initial collection. Within the decade, they had outgrown that building, and now encompass a total of 13 buildings, eight of which are on the National Historic Register. It’s definitely worth a visit.
  • Visit the Maine Media Workshops in Rockport Maine. The school offers not only classes and workshops for various media platforms but also have  several events throughout the summer and fall that are open to the community.  The school is an  international non-profit educational organization.
  • A short ferry ride from Rockland to North Haven or Vinalhaven or from Lincolnville to Isleboro can have you enjoying a day of bike riding around the island.
  • Take a walk through Brunswick’s Pine Grove Cemetery, and discover some of the most elaborate monuments found along the coast.  Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, the revered Union general frequently credited with turning the tide of the Battle of Gettysburg is buried a short distance from the main entrance.  Be sure not to miss the Joshua L. Chamberlain commemorative statue, by Maine artist Joseph Query, located at the intersection of Park Row and Maine Streets. Check with the Pejepscot Historical Society for information on  guided walking tours available.

Activities To Do On Your Maine Vacation – part 2

Looking for something do to before or after your Maine windjammer cruise? Plan a few extra days around your trip to Maine and enjoy one of these fun activities.

  • In June step back in history and watch majestic windjammers sail into Boothbay Harbor for Windjammer Days amid fanfare, street parade, and fireworks.  Tour these beautiful vessels while at dock.
  • For a nominal donation visit the Fort Edgecomb State Memorial, built in 1808, just off Rt. 1 by the Sheepscot River.  Open Memorial Day through Labor Day. Built in 1808, the Fort Edgecomb State Memorial is a 27-foot tall, octagonal-shaped building which serves as a memorial to Maine’s participation in the War of 1812. It was originally built to protect the busy shipping port in Wiscasset. It’s the best preserved fort from its time period in Maine.
  • Spend a day on Monhegan Island. The island is perfect for hiking with both novice and expert trails. It is also home to a variety of rare and uncommon species including the Bridled Tern.  In the fall sit on a cliff and watch flocks migrate south.
  • Pick up a free map when you rent a bike at BIKESENJAVA just off Rt.17 in Rockland.
  • Hike Sears Island in Searsport, park at the trail head off Island Road (on Rt.1) and walk across the causeway.  Uninhabited this is a great place to see some of the northern part of Penobscot Bay.

Maine Marine Forecast

Do you ever wonder how Captain Jon knows what the weather on the bay is going to be while you are out sailing? He tunes into the marine radio on board and listens to what NOAA has to say.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a federal agency focused on the condition of the oceans and atmosphere. According to their website “From daily weather forecasts, severe storm warnings and climate monitoring to fisheries management, coastal restoration and supporting marine commerce, NOAA’s products and services support economic vitality and affect more than one-third of America’s gross domestic product.” It was formed in 1970 by then President Richard Nixon for better protection of life and property from natural hazards from three existing agencies – the US Coast and Geodetic Survey (1807), the Weather Bureau (1870), and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries (1871).

With his experience, Captain Jon is able to listen to the NOAA forecast and interpret the best direction for the J&E Riggin to sail on any particular day and be able to look ahead for the length of a schooner cruise to have an idea of what our course might look like.

This link will take you to the written version of the radio broadcast that the Captain listens to every morning and evening.

Where Have You Seen Me?

This month’s “Where Have You Seen Me?” contest photo takes us away from Rockland and to a favorite destination. Do you recognize at what location this rock lies?

Guesses can be made in the comments section of the blog until May 4th. The winner will receive a hat from the Riggin Ship Store!

Maine Island Trail Association

The Maine Island Trail Association (MITA) is a group we are proud to be a part of. Founded in 1988, it is now the largest water trail association in North America and is a model for new trails across the country. MITA is a leader in balancing recreational access and conservation on the Maine coast. The water trail system is a 350-mile long waterway that consists of islands and mainland that are available for folks to visit. The waterway extends from Cape Porpoise Harbor to Machias Bay and includes several sites in coastal New Brunswick.

The Maine Island Trail Association (MITA) encourages participation in programs such as Island Clean-ups and the Adopt-An-Island program as well as Leave No Trace. Through partnerships with the State of Maine, as well as land trusts and generous private property owners, MITA ensures access to visitors in kayaks, sailboats, motorboats and other watercraft.

For more information on the Maine Island Trail Association, to make a donation, or become a member, please visit their website.


Where Have You Seen Me?

Congratulations to all of you who guessed last month’s photo correctly and to Dexter D who won the 8×10 photo of the Riggin. The stone compass rose lies on the grounds of the Camden Library over-looking the amphitheater. If you have a chance to visit Camden on your trip to Maine the amphitheater is quite beautiful, as are the ground of the library. Make a point to stop by the patio of the children’s section for the stone benches and books!
Here is this month’s photo. Guesses can be made in the comments section of the blog until March 21st. The winner will receive a set of recipe card postcards from Chef Annie’s cookbook At Home, At Sea.

Where Am I March

Good luck!

Nautical Term Tuesday – Sea Legs

Sea legs is a term used to describe the body’s adjustment to the motion of a ship; especially by ability to walk steadily and by freedom from seasickness. A person who has ‘not got his sea legs yet’ is one who is inexperienced at sea.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,991 other followers